The History and Meaning Behind the Color Blue in Art The first blue color was produced by ancient Egyptians in 2200 B.C.

The History and Meaning Behind the Color Blue in Art

The first blue color was produced by ancient Egyptians in 2200 B.C. in an effort to create a permanent pigment that could be applied to a variety of surfaces. Since, the color has continued to evolve, and its association with calming, natural elements like the sky and clear water have solidified it as a universal favorite among artists, interior designers and other disciplines.

Over the course of art history, artists of all media have utilized the multitude of unique shades of blue as a means of expression. Pablo Picasso himself underwent a “blue period” where all his paintings were created in shades of blue and blue-green to create a subdued, melancholic atmosphere. With the latest blue pigment, YInMn, which was discovered less than a decade ago, the color blue continues to unveil its artistic properties, carrying a rich history and significance for both artists and audiences alike.

Blue Color Meaning

The scarcity of the blue mineral lapis lazuli drove the earliest adopters to seek new ways of producing blue through chemistry. Because it was a rare and expensive mineral to acquire up until the dawn of the Industrial Age, it’s often associated with royalty and divinity, which is partly why it is widely a favorite color today. Blue can have a variety of meanings and symbolize a diverse range of ideals depending upon a culture’s beliefs.

Largely, the color blue is considered beneficial to the mind and body. It is believed that it slows human metabolism, which produces a calming effect. Light blue is associated with health, healing, and tranquility while dark blue represents a more powerful, serious, but sometimes melancholic nature.

SOURCE: invaluable.com